What the Placards Mean

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What the Placards Mean

White Placard

The white placard means the building is safe for normal use.

Owners and tenants can use buildings with white placards.

Even though the building has a white placard on the building, the building may have still suffered damage.

If your building is damaged then owners should seek technical advice from a chartered professional engineer or building professional then decide what remedial work is required. When that advice is received ensure that building consents are obtained if required before any work takes place. For consent information contact Marlborough District Council. Note: Some repair work which is like for like may not require building consents.

For further information on exempt building work:

See the Building Services section of this website

Please do not remove white placards from buildings because they will be used by the evaluation team to prevent unnecessary duplicate inspections.

The Council will advise through the news media when the placards can be removed. It is important to understand that building owners are always responsible for the safety of their buildings. If your building is potentially dangerous then you should make immediate arrangements to restrict entry or use of the building.

The status of the building may change with aftershocks. If the building receives further significant damage then contact Marlborough District Council.

Yellow Placard

The yellow placard means the building is potentially dangerous and identifies restrictions for use, and/or parts of the building.

Do not enter except as set out on the placard.

Owners may arrange emergency work or have the building demolished as an emergency measure without consent if it is necessary to protect public safety. If this occurs then please advise Marlborough District Council as soon as possible.

Some emergency work may change the status of the building from unsafe to safe and this will be done when the building is re-inspected. Do not remove placards. The evaluation team will change the placards if necessary.

Owners should seek technical advice from a chartered professional engineer or building professional then decide what remedial work is required. Some works can be undertaken without a building consent.

For further information on exempt building work:

See the Building section of this website

Any work that needs to be completed under urgency for which a building consent was required the property owner can apply for a Certificate of Acceptance once work is completed.

See Certificate of Acceptance information on this website

It is important to understand that building owners are always responsible for the safety of their buildings. If your building is potentially dangerous then you should make immediate arrangements to restrict entry or use of the building.

No person, including tenants, should enter any building, except as set out on the placard.

If alternative accommodation is required then go to the nearest welfare centre or make your own private arrangements.

The status of the building may change with aftershocks. If the building receives further significant damage then contact Marlborough District Council.

Red Placard

The red placard means the building is dangerous and should not be entered. Entry may be permitted after consultation with the Marlborough District Building Control Group.

Owners may arrange emergency work or have the building demolished as an emergency measure without consent if it is necessary to protect public safety. Before this occurs consultation with the Marlborough District Building Control Group is required.

For further information on exempt building work:

See the Building section of this website

Where a building consent is required, owners should seek technical advice from a chartered professional engineer then decide what remedial work is required. When that advice is received ensure that building consents are obtained before any work takes place.

It is important to understand that building owners are always responsible for the safety of their buildings. If your building is potentially dangerous then you should make immediate arrangements to prevent anyone entering or approaching dangerous areas.

No persons, including tenants, should enter any dangerous building.

Aftershocks may worsen the state of the building in which case emergency procedures by the owner may be needed to protect public safety. If the building receives further significant damage then contact Marlborough District Council.

Do not remove red placards from buildings.