Statutory Acknowledgements

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Statutory Acknowledgements

What is a Statutory Acknowledgement?

A statutory acknowledgement is legal recognition of the particular cultural, spiritual, historical and traditional association of an iwi with an identified statutory area.

Statutory acknowledgements form part of the iwi’s respective Treaty of Waitangi settlements with the Crown. These statutory acknowledgements recognise particular cultural, spiritual, historical and traditional associations of each iwi to particular sites/areas. Te Tau Ihu and Ngāi Tahu Statutory Acknowledgements are an attachment to the Marlborough Regional Policy Statement, the Marlborough Sounds Resource Management Plan and the Wairau/Awatere Resource Management Plan and the Marlborough Environment Plan.

Statutory acknowledgements enhance the ability of iwi to participate in Resource Management Act 1991 processes. A statutory area can have more than one statutory acknowledgement from more than one iwi associated with it and the statutory acknowledgements of each of the eight iwi of Te Tau Ihu and those of Ngai Tahu should be checked in relation to any statutory area.

Te Tau Ihu Iwi Statutory Acknowledgements

The settlements for Te Tau Ihu iwi were legislated in 2014 and were enacted on 1 August 2014.

The eight iwi of Te Tau Ihu to which these statutory acknowledgements and areas relate are:

  • Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō
  • Ngāti Kuia
  • Rangitāne o Wairau
  • Ngāti Koata
  • Ngāti Rārua
  • Ngāti Tama ki Te Tau Ihu
  • Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui
  • Ngāti Toa Rangatira

Note that these extend across the Marlborough District, Tasman District and Nelson City.

See Te Tau Ihu Statutory Acknowledgements

Maps

These maps depict statutory areas or sites to which Te Tau Iwi statutory acknowledgements apply.

The statutory acknowledgements place obligations on the local authorities which are explained in the statutory acknowledgements text document attached to the Marlborough Sounds Resource Management Plan, the Wairau/Awatere Resource Management Plan and the Marlborough Environment Plan. These maps do not however indicate all sites of importance to iwi. Other sites have been recognised through other redress instruments from the Crown such as land transfers in fee simple title or Overlay Classifications.

See Ngāi Tahu Statutory Acknowledgements

The settlement for Ngai Tahu was legislated in 1998 and enacted on 1 October 1998


More Information

If you would like information about other sites of importance to the iwi or the other types of redress recognising these sites you can source the Deeds of Settlement entered by the eight individual iwi and the Crown.

Go to the Deeds of Settlement

You can also go to the settlement legislation

The settlement Acts are:

  • Ngāti Kōata, Ngāti Rārua, Ngāti Tama ki Te Tau Ihu, and Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui Claims Settlement Act 2014.
  • Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Ngāti Kuia, and Rangitāne o Wairau Claims Settlement Act 2014.
  • Ngāti Toa Rangatira Claims Settlement Act 2014.
  • Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act 1998

Cultural Redress and Manawhenua

The Crown provided the statutory acknowledgements as cultural redress instruments to iwi to settle their historical Treaty claims. The location of these redress instruments aligns with the known customary and historical interests of the respective iwi. This redress is not intended to signify, confer, or deny the Māori concept of manawhenua. Manawhenua is a concept derived from tikanga Māori or customary values and practices. "Manawhenua" means "customary authority exercised by an iwi or hapu in an identified area" in the Resource Management Act 1991.